Educate Me: Heat Cycling Tires

greasy

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I need to heat cycle the Toyos. What's involved for proper hear cycling?
 

Intel

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can't really do it on the street as you won't get enough heat into them. Toyo RA1's right?
 

Bru

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Typically on the track or on a machine, right? I think Tire Tack has a machine. Not sure if anyone local.
 

Bru

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Plus for street use, it might not make that huge of a difference. You probably won't reach operating temps of those tires on the street.
 

BS ISF

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pulled this from another forum:

We talk about heat cycles as it effects the attributes of the tire's performance. A heat cycle is generally referring to a full heating (or overheating...) to operating temperature and this only makes a difference if you are running a tire that is soft enough that the tire will generate more grip when heated until it reaches a maximum temperature that when exceeded causes grip to fall off.

The reason tires tend to go away after a certain number of heat cycles is that the rubber vulcanizes more with each cycle. Vulcanizing is basically the process of forming additional crosslinks between molecules. Most of the things I have read say that vulcanization will continue for up to 24 hours after a heat cycle.

The degree of this change will be very variable depending on the exact formulation of the rubber, temperature that is achieved and to some extent the force that the rubber is subjected to during the heat cycle.

In other words: There is no one answer. Experience will teach what your car and your driving style will demand and what the results will be.

Some tires will cycle out very quickly. Often times these are the best race tires. This doesn't mean they become dangerous. It means they become uncompetitive. For example Hoosiers and to a lesser extent Kuhmo Victoracers are known to cycle out pretty quickly. Toyos are known to be almost cycle proof. In between lies a universe of tires.
 

greasy

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pulled this from another forum:



We talk about heat cycles as it effects the attributes of the tire's performance. A heat cycle is generally referring to a full heating (or overheating...) to operating temperature and this only makes a difference if you are running a tire that is soft enough that the tire will generate more grip when heated until it reaches a maximum temperature that when exceeded causes grip to fall off.



The reason tires tend to go away after a certain number of heat cycles is that the rubber vulcanizes more with each cycle. Vulcanizing is basically the process of forming additional crosslinks between molecules. Most of the things I have read say that vulcanization will continue for up to 24 hours after a heat cycle.



The degree of this change will be very variable depending on the exact formulation of the rubber, temperature that is achieved and to some extent the force that the rubber is subjected to during the heat cycle.



In other words: There is no one answer. Experience will teach what your car and your driving style will demand and what the results will be.



Some tires will cycle out very quickly. Often times these are the best race tires. This doesn't mean they become dangerous. It means they become uncompetitive. For example Hoosiers and to a lesser extent Kuhmo Victoracers are known to cycle out pretty quickly. Toyos are known to be almost cycle proof. In between lies a universe of tires.

Awesome info bud, thanks! It seems like consensus is pretty clear.....I don't need to worry about it.
 

chris101

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I never noticed any real differences on Toyo R888s or RA1s with heat cycling.

Where I did notice the MOST difference is with Hoosiers. They last better and longer with a proper heatcycle. We typically run a normal 15 minute cycle getting good heat into the tires and then remove them from the car and let them sit for at least 24 hours but best results seem to be leaving them for at least 1 week to fully properly cure.
 

123bobby123

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If your sure it's a good idea to heat cycle your tires I don't see why you couldn't pop them in the oven if you are lucky to have a big enough one. Usually only need temps in the 160F area if I remember correctly but it depends on the tire as the optimal temp is different for each one.
 

123bobby123

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^i know that sounds stupid but the more I think of it you could probably buy a big enough used oven off craigslist or eBay for the cost of a track day and it would let u control exactly your temps n times. Lol
 

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